DO YOU REALLY KNOW ME? – John 7:25-30

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INTRODUCTION:

The agony of defeat!  Do those words bring back memories from the past?  Has a personal defeat or the defeat of your favorite team ever left you speechless for a few moments?  Did you feel shocked, drained emotionally, and at a loss for words?  We’ve all experienced times like that, haven’t we?  You don’t feel like saying anything, and even if you did, you don’t know what you would say.  You’re still trying to process it through your brain so that you can decide what to say and do next.  Recently, on June 22nd of this year, one of Argentina’s leading sportscasters, held a minute of silence after their national soccer team was defeated decisively by Croatia, with a final score of 3-0.  It was one of those occasions!

The passage of Scripture we are now studying, John 7:25-30, begins on a similar note.  After being defeated by Jesus’ arguments in verses 19-24, all is quiet on the Jerusalem front . . . too quiet!  Jesus continues to teach in the temple and the rulers of the Jews are doing nothing to stop Him.  These rulers who have been trying to kill Him, are now standing there quietly, taking it all in.  What’s going on?  The people of Jerusalem are trying to come up with an explanation for this phenomenon.  That’s the scene as we begin our study of John 7:25-30.

I.  THE PEOPLE EXPRESS THEIR THOUGHTS (verses 25-26)

In their amazement and confusion, the people of Jerusalem look at each other and ask themselves, “Could it be?”, or more accurately, “It couldn’t be, could it?”  Here are their words in verses 25-26: ” . . . Is this not the man whom they were seeking to kill?  And look, He is speaking publicly, and they are saying nothing to Him.  The rulers do not really know that this is the Christ, do they?”  In their confusion, they are beginning to ask each other, “Is there something the rulers know that we don’t know?”  “Is there something they haven’t told us?”  “They’ve been seeking to kill Him as an impostor; do they now have evidence that proves that He’s really the Messiah?”  They are beginning to come to a conclusion based upon what they see and hear.  But that line of reasoning was very short-lived.  They dismissed that idea in a hurry.  It was an opportunity to reconsider their persuasion about Jesus, and they turned it down.  In verse 27 we learn why they quickly answered their own questions and changed their minds.

II.  THE PEOPLE CHANGE THEIR MINDS (verse 27)

Verse 27 reads, “However, we know where this man is from; but whenever the Christ may come, no one knows where He is from.”  In their minds, Jesus couldn’t be the Messiah because they knew where He was from – at least, they thought they knew.  The rulers surmised that Jesus was born in Nazareth because that’s where He grew up.  They didn’t realize, nor did they care to know, that He was actually born in Bethlehem in fulfillment of Micah’s prophesy concerning the birthplace of the Messiah.(Micah 5:2).  Little did they know that, by saying those words about Jesus in verse 27, they were fulfilling prophesy.  The prophet Isaiah says in Isaiah 53:3, “He was despised and forsaken of men . . . He was despised, and we did not esteem Him.”  That’s no way to treat your long-awaited Messiah!

The rest of verse 27 tells us what caused them to change their minds in such a hurry.  They reverted back to what they had been taught.  But there is much more to their comment than just the physical birthplace of Jesus.  They are also referring to the way in which the Messiah is supposed to appear on the scene.  The rabbis taught that the Messiah would make Himself known suddenly and without warning.  A popular belief was that the immediate ancestry of the Messiah would not be known.  In fact, many of them believed that the Messiah Himself wouldn’t know who He was or where He was from.  According to the teaching of the rulers, the Messiah would have no identity nor power until the prophet Elijah suddenly appears and anoints Him as King.  Justin, a second-century writer, received that same response in a conversation with a Jew.  Suddenness was key to their beliefs concerning the coming of the Messiah.  Bible commentators, William Barclay and Leon Morris, both share a popular saying of the rabbis of that day:  “Three things come wholly unexpectedly:  the Messiah, a godsend (or windfall), and a scorpion.”  In spite of all the prophesies of Scripture that the Lord Jesus has already fulfilled by His birth, His life, His words, and His miracles, these inhabitants of Jerusalem would rather stick with sayings and speculations that aren’t even found in the Scriptures.  It almost makes me want to shout, “Surprise!  He’s already here in your presence, and He’s the topic of your conversations!”

III.  JESUS PROCLAIMS HIS TRUE IDENTITY (verses 28-29)

Obviously, Jesus knows what they have been saying to one another about Him because He cries out in a loud voice for everyone in the temple to hear.  We live in an age of microphones, amplifiers and speaker systems, but have you ever said, in a loud voice, “Your attention, please”, or a similar phrase to get everyone to focus their attention on you and what you have to say? That was Jesus’ purpose for raising His voice.  He wanted everyone to hear what He was about to say to them because it was important information.  The Lord Jesus taught in many different areas of the temple.  For example, He taught in the Court of the Gentiles (John 2:13-16 and Luke 19:45-48), Solomon’s Porch (John 10:23), and the Court of the Women (Mark 10:41).  In this case, He was in one of the courtyards of the temple, and the bigger the room and the noisier the crowd, the louder you have to shout, right?  This is not the first time, and it won’t be the last time that He shouts loud enough for all to hear.  In those days the rabbis would sit as they instructed the people, but Jesus stood, as the prophets of the Old Testament stood when they proclaimed what God had revealed to them.   We find an example of this in verse 37.  The Lord Jesus would also be able to project His voice farther from that standing position.

The following are the words spoken by Jesus in verse 28:  “You both know Me and know where I am from, and I have not come of Myself, but He who sent me is true, whom you do not know.”  I wonder whether the first words from His mouth startled the people even more than His loud voice.  He was agreeing with them!  At least, that’s the way it appears when He says, “You both know Me and know where I am from.”  Why would He say that?  Is there any truth to that statement?  Is He being sarcastic?  No, this is all part of His plan as He directs the conversation.  After all, He did grow up in Nazareth as the Son of Mary and Joseph.  That’s all these leaders know about Him, and that’s all they care to know.  Rather than argue with them about His human origin, Jesus reminds them of His heavenly mission.  There’s more to the story than just human geography.  Before He was born, He was sent.  That makes Him greater than the prophets, who were called by God at a specific time in their lives and sent out to proclaim His message, whereas Jesus was sent before He was born.

Once again, the Lord Jesus adjusts the focus of their attention, moving it away from Himself and placing it upon the Sender.  They know that He is talking about God because He has used those words before.  He describes His Heavenly Father with these words:  “He who sent Me is true.”  Wouldn’t that be obvious to His listeners?  The Scriptures describe God as being eternal and unchanging.  But the word “true”, in this instance, has a different meaning.  Jesus is saying that the One who sent Him is “real”. He’s “authentic” and “genuine”.  He’s “worthy of being believed”.  He can be known personally and intimately.  He is worthy of genuine worship and wholehearted obedience.

This revelation about God is followed by a rebuke, as Jesus reveals what’s true concerning His listeners.  After describing the Father who sent Him, Jesus looks around at them and says “whom you do not know”.  He has made that statement several times before and He’ll be saying it again.  They did not know God because they did not know Jesus nor recognize Him as their Messiah.  You can’t know one without the other.  They are inseparable.

In verse 29, Jesus summarizes what He has just said, giving the basis for His knowledge of God.  He says, “I know Him because I am from Him, and He sent me.”  His knowledge [“I know Him”], His origin [“I am from Him”], and His mission [“He sent me”] constitute a strong foundation for His identity as the Messiah, the Son of God.

IV.  THE INITIAL RESPONSE (verse 30)

End of discussion!  Since they couldn’t refute Him, and they refused to believe the words Jesus said about them, verse 30 tells us:  “They were seeking therefore to seize Him.”  The leaders wanted to apprehend Him and take Him into custody so that the people would no longer be able to listen to Him. 

However, there were two obstacles keeping them from accomplishing their desire.  First of all, the nation of Israel was under Roman law, and the only ones who had the authority to arrest someone were the Roman authorities and the Temple authorities.  The other reason why the Jews couldn’t take Jesus into custody at that time is given in the remainder of verse 30 – ” no man laid his hand on Him, because His hour had not yet come.”  The time of His betrayal and arrest was set by the Father, and until then, there was much work to be done.

Why is it so hard to resist revenge or retaliation, even when you’re the one in the wrong?  The problem still exists today.  Psychologists have given a name to this phenomenon.  They call it “cognitive immunization”  The term is used to explain how some people’s minds become immune to reality, and their mistaken beliefs become even stronger in the face of reality or truth.  The Bible speaks of such people as those who have “seared their own conscience as with a branding iron” (I Timothy 4:2).  It’s a matter of personal choice and responsibility.  The following true story teaches a lesson about revenge.

A successful young lawyer in Hungary during the 1950’s was a strong believer in freedom for his country.  When the uprising failed, he was forced to flee the country.  He arrived in the U.S. with no money, no job, and no friends.  He was, however, well-educated; he spoke and wrote several languages, including English.  For several months he tried to get a job in a law office, but because of his lack of familiarity with American law, he received only polite refusals.

Finally, it occurred to him that with his knowledge of language he might be able to get a job with an import-export company.  He selected one such company and wrote a letter to the owner.  Two weeks later he received an answer, but was hardly prepared for the vindictiveness of the man’s reply.  Among other things, it said that even if they did need someone, they wouldn’t hire him because he couldn’t even write good English.

Crushed, this young lawyer’s hurt quickly turned to anger.  What right did this rude, arrogant man have to tell him that he couldn’t write the language!  The man was obviously crude and uneducated — his letter was chock-full of grammatical errors!  So he sat down and, in the white heat of anger, wrote a scathing reply, calculated to rip the man to shreds.  When he’d finished, however, as he was reading it over, his anger began to drain away.  Then he remembered the Bible verse, “A soft answer turneth away wrath.”

No, he wouldn’t mail the letter.  Maybe the man was right.  English was not his native tongue.  Maybe he did need further study in it.  Possibly this man had done him a favor by making him realize he did need to work harder on perfecting his English.  He tore up the letter and wrote another.  This time he apologized for the previous letter, explained his situation, and thanked the man for pointing out his need for further study.

Two days later he received a phone call inviting him to New York for an interview.  A week later he went to work for them as a correspondent.  Later, he became vice president and executive officer of the company, destined to succeed the man he had hated and sought revenge against for a fleeting moment — and then resisted.

CONCLUSION:

Life is filled with choices, isn’t it?  Most of those choices have a reason and a motive behind them.  Some of our choices can have long-lasting effects, as that illustration pointed out.  The only choice in this life that will change the direction of our lives for eternity is the personal choice to believe in the Lord Jesus Christ as one’s Lord and Savior, and follow Him.   In verse 28, after describing His relationship to His heavenly Father, He looked around at His listeners and said “whom you do not know”.  Do you know God?  Do you have a personal and intimate relationship with Him?  That’s not possible without knowing and following the One whom He has sent.  This is an opportunity to reconsider your persuasion about Jesus Christ.  Please don’t turn it down.  Don’t respond to the truths of God’s Word with anger, hatred, or excuses.  Resist that urge.  Tear up those thoughts and feelings and start over again.   Let God give you a fresh perspective and a new life as a result of believing in Jesus Christ and following Him.  He will give you peace, joy, and purpose, with no regrets (II Corinthians 5:17).

If you have already made that decision and are now a follower of Christ, with a transformed life and a new purpose for living, share those riches in Christ with those around you.  There is more than enough, and the need is great.

CONSTRUCTION SITE:  COMPLETED

May God give you insight and draw you closer to Him as you study and apply His Word.

 

 

PRACTICING THE TRUTH – James 1:19-27

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INTRODUCTION: James now comes to the basic theme of his letter:  the importance of behaving like we believe.  In these verses James states that we have three responsibilities toward God’s Word;  and if we fulfill these responsibilities, we will have an honest relationship with God and with others.

I.  PREPARE OURSELVES TO RECEIVE THE WORD (verses 19-21)

Our first responsibility toward God’s Word is to prepare ourselves to receive it.  James says that we can do this by: 1)  Being quick to hear.   To prepare ourselves for the truth, we must be ready to listen to God and to others.  Romans 10:17 says, “Faith cometh by hearing, and hearing  by the Word of God.”  Just as a servant is quick to hear his master’s voice, and a mother is quick to hear her baby’s smallest cry, so the believer should be quick to hear what God has to say.  Listening is a part of loving.  It involves giving of ourselves and our attention wholeheartedly to another person.  And this involves really caring;  setting aside our own concerns and focusing on God or on others.  It’s much easier to find a good speaker than a good listener. 2)  Being slow to speak.  Proverbs 17:27 says, “He who has knowledge spares his words.”  God gave us two ears and one mouth,  which ought to remind us to listen more than we speak.  An anonymous poem goes like this:

A wise old bird sat on an oak.  The more he saw the less he spoke.                         The less he spoke the more he heard.  Lord, make me like that wise old bird.

We learn while listening, not while talking.  Those who want to learn the truth must silence their tongues in order to hear God speak. 3)  Being slow to anger.  Don’t get angry at God or His Word.  A pastor once said:  “Temper is such a valuable thing, it is a shame to lose it!”  It is temper that helps to give steel its strength.  The person who cannot get angry at sin does not have much strength to fight it.  But James warns us against getting angry at God’s Word because it reveals our sins to us.  Like the man who broke the mirror because he didn’t like the image he saw in it, people rebel against God’s Word because it tells the truth about them and their sinfulness.  The story is told that when Leonardo da Vinci was about to paint his masterpiece “The Lord’s Supper”, he had a serious quarrel with another man.  A spirit of revenge began to grow in his heart.  It occurred to him that when he painted the picture of Judas, the one who betrayed the Savior, he could easily make Judas’s face look like the face of his enemy.  And that’s just what Leonardo did.  At last he came to the figure of Jesus.  His attempts to paint his impression of Jesus were a complete failure.  He tried again and again, but still no success.  In his heart he knew why he was having such difficulty.  He finally took his brush and painted out the face of Judas.  Then, going to his enemy, he confessed the ill-will he had been feeling toward him.  With a cleansed mind, he returned to his work and painted the figure of our Lord with the freedom and genius that resulted in a masterpiece.  Leonardo found that when he had evil and revenge in his heart, he was not able to reproduce the likeness of the Master, neither in his own personal life, nor on his canvas.  Anger makes a mess of our lives and blocks God’s truth from coming in. 4)  Having a prepared heart  (verse 21)  James saw the human heart as a garden.  If left to itself the soil would produce nothing but weeds. James urges us to pull out the weeds and prepare the soil for the implanted Word of God.  How?  First, by confessing our sins and asking God to forgive us.  Then by meditating on God’s grace and asking Him to “plow up” any hardness in our hearts.  Finally, we must have an attitude of “meekness”, which is the opposite of wrath.  “Setting aside filthiness” means demonstrating that we appreciate the blessings of God by eliminating the sins and bad habits in our lives that destroy our witness for Christ. One day a preacher visited a coal-mining town and noticed how dingy it was.  The coal dust seemed to blacken the buildings, the trees, the shrubs and everything else.  As he was walking down the street with the foreman of the mine, his attention was focused on a beautiful, white flower.  He said, “The owner of this flower surely must take good care of it.  There’s no dust and dirt on it at all.”  The foreman threw a handful of dust on the flower.  It immediately fell off and left the flower as stainless as before.  “It has a natural enamel which prevents any dust from clinging to it”, the foreman explained.  “I think it must have been created especially for such a place as this.”  This is the way Christians are to be in this world, which is filthy because of the dust and dirt of sin.  God gives a spiritual enamel to those who yield themselves completely to the leadership of the Holy Spirit,  and who  seek to make Jesus Christ the Lord of their lives.

II.  PRACTICE THE WORD (verses 22-25)

It is not enough to hear God’s Word.  James says, in verses 22-25, that our second responsibility toward God’s Word is to practice it.  Many Christians have the mistaken idea that hearing a good sermon or Bible study makes them grow and get God’s blessing.  It’s not the hearing, but the doing, that brings God’s blessing. In verses 23-25, James compares the forgetful hearer with the doer.  The forgetful hearer is like the person who looks at himself in the mirror, notices his uncombed hair, dirty face, and unbrushed teeth, and instead of taking care of himself, he goes on his way, forgetting all about the problems and presenting a very unattractive appearance to others.  In the same way, a Christian who hears God’s Word without doing anything about it,  turns other people away from the Savior, rather than drawing them to Him. A bus driver became annoyed with his job because he had to wait seven minutes after every run near an open field which “litterbugs” had made into an “unofficial dump”.  He often thought that someone ought to do something about that unsightly mess.  One day he himself decided to get out and pick up some of the tin cans and other debris which were lying all around.  This improved things so much that he soon was eager to complete his route and spend all his free moments in cleaning up the area.  When spring came, he was so enthusiastic about his project that he decided to plant some flower seeds.  By the end of the summer many people were riding to the end of the line just to see what the bus driver had accomplished by “doing” what he and others had only “talked about” before.  Are you brightening the corner where you are? In verse 25, the words “looks intently” come from the Greek word which means “to stoop down”.  It refers to the Christian who humbles himself before the Word of God and lets God’s Word become a part of him, so that he becomes more like Christ in his attitudes and actions.  I have been reading from a daily devotional by Billy Graham, and in yesterday’s devotion on becoming like Christ, he said a few words that convicted me so much that I wrote them on a piece of paper so that I could put it in my wallet as a reminder.  Speaking to Christians, he said these words:  “You should be closer to God today in heart, soul, and body, than at any other time in your life.”

III.  SHARE THE WORD (verses 26,27)

In verses 26 and 27, James tells us that our third responsibility to God’s Word is to share it.  James gives us three tests to enable us to find out if we are taking God’s Word seriously.  The first test is self-control.  Are we able to control our speech so that we’re not lying, gossiping, or using filthy language.  The second test is compassion.  Are we concerned about the needs of others, and are we demonstrating that concern.  The third test is  holiness of life. Noah sent out two birds from the ark.  One was a raven – a ceremonially unclean animal;  the other was a dove, which was a clean animal and became the symbol of the Holy Spirit and holiness.  The raven did not return to the ark, even though the waters were still upon the earth.  No doubt it found a place to rest upon the floating body of some animal.  The second bird, however,  a ceremonial clean creature, returned to Noah for she could find “no rest for the sole of her foot.”  The dove would not land on an unclean thing like a corpse!  Someone has said, “In a world of sin we too have the choice of being a raven or a dove, unclean or clean, spotted or unspotted.  By the power of God’s grace, let’s keep ourselves uncontaminated by the things of the world.  While the Christian must live in the world, he should not let the world live in him..

CONCLUSION:  No sermon is done until we have done something about it.  As the apostle James said:  “Be doers of the Word, and not hearers only”.  May our prayer be that of the hymn writer, Ira Wilson:  “O Savior, I pray, Make me a blessing to someone today.”